He Walked through the Fields [הוא הלך בשדות]

Author(s): Moshe Shamir
Memorial Day for Uri in the fictional kibbutz Gat HaAmakim. A member of the kibbutz tells us about how things have changed, so much so that Uri won't recognize the place. He tells us who Uri was: the first son born in the kibbutz, warrior in the Palmach. Uri’s parents are separating when he returns to the kibbutz from agricultural school; his dad has just returned from a mission abroad, bringing surviving children, over a very rough road via Teheran. Uri meets a young girl, Mika, who was brought by his dad. Mika was a well-educated girl before the war, but has a dubious past. They fall in love and move in together, and the kibbutz is not happy: everyone, including Uri's mom, thinks Uri deserves a better girl. Uri is called into service, and fights with Mika, who is pregnant, although nobody knows. Uri's platoon is ordered to blow up a bridge to stop the British soldiers reaching an illegal ship, and Uri swaps places with the bomber and is wounded badly. Mika is on her way to have an abortion, but when she learns that Uri has died, she keeps the child and makes peace with Uri's mother.
Cast Size:14M/11F

Snapshot

Original or Prominent Production:
Cameri Theater, 1948
Original Source Material: Based on the novel by Moshe Shamir, He Walked through the Fields, 1947.
Nationality of Author: Israeli
Original Language: Hebrew

Browse the Plays

Play Index

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

HTC Insights

Views, reference and research of interest.

A Personal Welcome to the Holocaust Theater Catalog

A Message from Arnold Mittelman After a career in not-for-profit and commercial theater spanning more than 40 years I was honored in 2007 to found the National Jewish Theater / Foundation and in 2010 to assume leadership of its Holocaust Theater International...

Many Questions and a Few Answers

by Robert Skloot 2022 NJTF HTII Lifetime Achievement Award AHO Winter Conference, Miami, FL I’d like to begin my remarks by asking the question that all of us have been asked often: “Why do you do the work you do?” There are, of course, many answers, but I’d imagine...