Kingfishers Catch Fire

It’s 1948 when Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty first visits the infamous Nazi Herbert Kappler in the Italian prison where Kappler is serving a life sentence for crimes against humanity. During World War II, the men were adversaries; Kappler was the head of the Gestapo in German-occupied Rome, and Monsignor O’Flaherty was using the cover of Vatican neutrality to shelter and arrange for the escape of thousands of Allied servicemen and Jewish civilians. Kappler placed a bounty on O’Flaherty’s head, but O’Flaherty evaded capture, earning the nickname “The Scarlet Pimpernel of the Vatican.” When these two men meet after the war, profound questions of responsibility and redemption rattle the cages. Based on a true story, Kingfishers Catch Fire examines morality and personal culpability for actions taken during a devastating war.
Format: Full Length
Cast Size:2M
Running Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes in 2 acts
Character breakdown:

Monsignor Hugh O’Flaherty

Herbert Kappler

Notes:

This is the world premiere of Kingfishers Catch Fire, inspired by the true story of Herbert Kappler and Monsignor O’Flaherty. Kingfishers Catch Fire received a staged reading in 2016 as part of the Irish Rep Reading Series.

Snapshot

Original or Prominent Production:
Irish Repertory Theatre, New York City
Original Source Material: inspired by the true story of Herbert Kappler and Monsignor O’Flaherty
Nationality of Author: Irish
Original Language: English

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