Luba

The play tells the story of Luba, 19, and her younger brother Meesha, 16, fleeing their home in Dubno, Poland (now Ukraine), ahead of the advancing German armies in June 1941. It depicts their hair-raising experiences of traveling to, and life as refugees deep in, the Soviet Union. The play covers episodes of their one-and-a-half-year stay among the Uzbeks in a small town near Samarkand, Uzbekistan. It focuses on Luba as the main protagonist and her valiant exploits as she risks her life to search for Meesha and, finding him in an army training center, engineers his dangerous escape.
Format: Full-length drama (abridged version also available)
Cast Size:2F/6M
Character breakdown:

Luba: The main protagonist, in her early 20s
Meesha: Luba’s brother, in his late teens
Olga: Cottage owner, in late her 40s
Sergey: Olga’s friend, in his early 70s
Andrey: The sergeant, in his late 20s
Ivan: A soldier in his late teens
Draft official: In his 40s
Soldier: In his 20s

Snapshot

Original or Prominent Production:
Dramatic Reading at Sisterhood Breakfast of Highland Park Conservative Temple, Highland Park, NJ, December 14, 2014.
Original Source Material: Based on the book Shards of War: Fleeing to & from Uzbekistan by Michael Kesler.
Nationality of Author: U.S.
Original Language: English
Publisher:

Shards of War: Fleeing to & from Uzbekistan is published by Strategic Publishing Group, Durham, Connecticut, 2010.

Production Rights Holder:

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