Shop [מכולת]

A family of survivors lives in a small apartment in Jaffa, with a small grocery shop attached to it: an old father, his two sons, one of them married with a son. They live a very poor and pathetic existence until they learn they are about to get a payment from Germany. They start to live it up in anticipation of the money they will get, hoping to finally be accepted into Israeli society: Aharal'e, the unmarried son, marries an old costumer of the shop. He hopes to use the money to break free from his family and write his great novel. Yossel, the second son, spends money on appliances, and in agreement with his wife, sells the shop in order to buy a new apartment in Bat Yam. Tanhum, Yossel's son, takes money from the cash register for the woman he loves who has a baby. Yossel and his wife want to put Dov, Yossel’s elderly father, into a home, but when the father hears about it he suffers a heart attack. Then it turns out the family loses their right to the money because of a false testimony of Dov in another claim. They lose their home and shop.
Format: Drama
Cast Size:4F/7M

Snapshot

Original or Prominent Production:
Habimah, 1982
Nationality of Author: Israeli
Original Language: Hebrew
Publisher:

Or Am

Experience(s) Chronicled: Survivors and Subsequent Generations

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